MR-CRAS

Introduction and disclaimer

MR-CRAS is a new clinically and construct validate, structured short-term risk assessment instrument called the Mechanical Restraint–Confounders, Risk, Alliance Score (MR-CRAS), with the intended purpose of supporting the clinicians’ observation and assessment of the patient’s readiness to be released from mechanical restraint.

Disclaimer: MR-CRAS is currently being further developed so that items paired with conflict and risk management strategies can be used by clinicians in order to facilitate decisions in regard to discontinuation of mechanical restraint. Current version does not contain such conflict and risk management strategies and has therefore not be effect tested for its ability to reduce time spend in mechanical restraint. Future advancements and developments will be made available on this web page.

Collaboration contacts:

Lea D. Nielsen: ldni[a]ucsyd.dk

Frederik A. Gildberg: fgildberg[a]health.sdu.dk

Center for Psychiatric Nursing and Health Research, Institute of Regional Health Research, Faculty of Health Science, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

MR-CRAS for download*:

User manual (ENG version)
MR-CRAS (ENG version)

User manual (DK version)
MR-CRAS (DK version)

* Soon available

 

Available Literature

Nielsen, L.D., Beck, P., Hounsgaard, L., Gildberg, F.A. 2017. 
Mechanical Restraint – Confounders, Risk, Alliance Score: 
Testing the clinical validity of a new risk assessment instrument.
Nordic Journal Of Psychiatry.2017,v.71,6, pp.441-447 
Online. DOI:10.1080/08039488.2017.1318949 
Research: Article, Peer reviewed. Status: Published.

Unstructured risk assessment, as well as confounders (underlying reasons for the patient’s risk behaviour and alliance), risk behaviour, and parameters of alliance, have been identified as factors that prolong the duration of mechanical restraint among forensic mental health inpatients. Aim: To clinically validate a new, structured short-term risk assessment instrument called the Mechanical Restraint–Confounders, Risk, Alliance Score (MR-CRAS), with the intended purpose of supporting the clinicians’ observation and assessment of the patient’s readiness to be released from mechanical restraint. The content and layout of MR-CRAS and its user manual were evaluated using face validation by forensic mental health clinicians, content validation by an expert panel, and pilot testing within two, closed forensic mental health inpatient units. The three sub-scales (Confounders, Risk, and a parameter of Alliance) showed excellent content validity. The clinical validations also showed that MR-CRAS was perceived and experienced as a comprehensible, relevant, comprehensive, and useable risk assessment instrument. Conclusions: MR-CRAS contains 18 clinically valid items, and the instrument can be used to support the clinical decision-making regarding the possibility of releasing the patient from mechanical restraint. Implications: The present three studies have clinically validated a short MR-CRAS scale that is currently being psychometrically tested in a larger study.

 

Nielsen, L.D., Gildberg, F.A., Dalsgaard, J.L., Munksgaard, G., Beck, P., Hounsgaard, L. 2018. 
Forensic mental health clinician´s experiences with and assessment of alliance regarding the 
patient´s readiness to be released from mechanical restraint. 
International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 27,pp.116-125 
doi: 10.1111/inm.12300 
Research: Article, Peer reviewed. Status: Published.

One of the main reasons for prolonged duration of mechanical restraint is patient behaviour in relation to the clinician-patient alliance. This article reports on the forensic mental health clinicians experiences of the clinician-patient alliance during mechanical restraint, and their assessment of parameters of alliance regarding the patient’s readiness to be released from restraint. We used a qualitative, descriptive approach and conducted focus group interviews with nurses, nurse assistants and social and healthcare assistants. The results show that a pre-established personal clinician-patient alliance formed the basis for entering into, and weighing the quality of, the alliance during mechanical restraint. In consideration of the patient’s psychiatric condition, the clinicians observed and assessed two quality parameters for the alliance: ‘the patient’s insight into or understanding of present situation’ (e.g. the reasons for mechanical restraint and the behaviour required of the patient to discontinue restraint) and ‘the patient’s ability to have good and stable contact and cooperation with and across clinicians. These assessments were included, as a total picture of the quality of the alliance with the patient’, in the overall team assessment of the patient’s readiness to be released from mechanical restraint. The results contribute to inform the development of a short-term risk assessment instrument, with the aim of reducing the duration of mechanical restraint.

 

Gildberg, FA, Fristed, P, Makransky, G, Moeller, EH, Nielsen, LD, Bradley, SK. 2015
As Time Goes by: Reasons and characteristics of prolonged episodes of mechanical restraint
in forensic psychiatry. 
Vol. 11, No.1, 41-50. Journal of Forensic Nursing. 
doi: 10.1097/JFN.0000000000000055
Research: Article, peer reviewed. Status: Published.

Evidence suggests the prevalence and duration of mechanical restraint are particularly high among forensic psychiatric inpatients. However, only sparse knowledge exists regarding the reasons for, and characteristics of, prolonged use of mechanical restraint in forensic psychiatry. This study therefore aimed to investigate prolonged episodes of mechanical restraint on forensic psychiatric inpatients. Documentary data from medical records were thematically analyzed. Results show that the reasons for prolonged episodes of mechanical restraint on forensic psychiatric inpatients can be characterized by multiple factors: “confounding” (behavior associated with psychiatric conditions, substance abuse, medical noncompliance, etc.), “risk” (behavior posing a risk for violence), and “alliance parameters” (qualities of the staff-patient alliance and the patients’ openness to alliance with staff), altogether woven into a mechanical restraint spiral that in itself becomes a reason for prolonged mechanical restraint. The study also shows lack of consistent clinical assessment during periods of restraint. Further investigation is indicated to develop an assessment tool with the capability to reduce time spent in mechanical restraint.