Other Articles

j0439532-300x200Paper on Education:2010

At the edge?: – Psychiatric nursing research and challenges in core training. Gildberg, F. A. & Hounsgaard, L. 2010 I : Gjallerhorn. 2010, 12, s. 107-114.

To answer the question as to how and in what direction nursing training should develop with regard to psychiatric nursing, demands not only knowledge of the existing training, but also an understanding of psychiatric nursing. This article suggests that personal qualities, understood as ways in which staff behave and conduct themselves with patients, played a central role in psychiatric nursing at the start of the 19th century. Personal qualities continue to be found in modern psychiatric teaching material and in international research. The article argues that the key to developing students’ competencies could be that students are given the opportunity to have and to test their experiences in mental health nursing repeatedly with respect to the literature and in the real world, in order to have ownership over the applied strategies in the clinic. That is, of course, if they are appropriate. Furthermore it is clear that nursing schools must build all teaching on existing – albeit scarce – research results and close co-operation with universities must be considered as essential. The requirement for any research and teaching should be that it is centred round the clinic, empirically tested and that it is relevant in its theoretical and methodological approach. One challenge therefore in the core training is to equip the students for psychiatry, for example in extended placements, continued research-based teaching and in equipping them with tools, such as symbolic interactionism, to give an understanding of the interactions that occur in practice.